Monday, 23 March 2015

Catch and Store Energy

"Make Hay While the Sun Shines"




Today I am sharing my thoughts on the second permaculture principle; Catch and Store Energy. Please go to this link for my discussion on principle one. For expert information about the principles of permaculture you may like to check out the website of David Holmgren.

Catch and store energy is about designing systems that catch energy and store it before it is moves on to where we cannot use it. In a self-supporting house hold there are many opportunities to implement this principle. In our times, the most pressing reason for implementing this principle is peak oil and its effect on the economy.   “We can take action now to anticipate climate change and peak oil and adapt, or we can postpone action and be forced to adapt later at far greater cost.” (from “A Call for Action” Brisbane City Council. An internet archive of this report can be found here. ) We cannot continue with a “business as usual” attitude if we are going to navigate our way through the changing tides of energy decent.




Some examples of catching and storing energy are:
Solar hot water systems
Water stored in dams and water tanks.
Building homes with good cross ventilation.
Solar electricity
Solar powered water pumps
Solar powered livestock fencing.

A great example of some someone who is catching and storing energy is  Gardening Australia presenter Josh Byrne, who has built his home to catch and store energy and it produces more electricity than it uses. His home design is based on passive solar principles. For more information on Josh Byrne's home take a look at his website .

Are you familiar with permaculture? How do you apply the principle catch and store energy in your life?

8 comments:

  1. It is amazing how many homes are also still not insulated to catch the warmth of heaters in the winter. Australians still have not got serious about double glazing or off-grid solar

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    1. So true. I don't know anybody who has off-grid solar.

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  2. only have a solar hot water system so far, wanted to get solar panels but the prices are way out of my reach but my power usage has gone down now that i'm the only one living here. grow my own vegies (when they grow) & have a few chooks.
    interesting post
    thanx for sharing

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    1. Yes we have solar hot water, but I would like to have solar panels too. I also want to look into getting a solar water pump for the dam, which would reduce my grid electricity consumption.

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  3. I think this is one of the most important permaculture principles we should try and incorporate into our lives as we move towards an energy descent future. We have 13 solar panels and feed back to the grid, though would love to have batteries one day. We also have solar hot water, roof insulation and a small tank for the garden. Our house is not the best orientation for passive solar (we are east west) but we do the best we can with blinds and shade plants where needed.

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    1. Yes I would love to have batteries for storing solar energy too. Sometimes I think I would like to have a bit of each, solar that feeds back to the grid and solar with battery storage. It would be nice to have all the bases covered, so to speak.

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  4. We have solar panels, lots and lots of water tanks, roof insulation and would love to have solar hot water and double glazing on the windows but that is too expensive.

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    1. Solar panels and more water tanks are on my long term wish list. :-)

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